The Pinking Dindies

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NOTE. This is a nicely atmospheric piece about the criminal gang called the Pinking Dindies, evoking the Dublin of Clarence Mangan’s boyhood (coæval at least by the reputation of the Pinks, then within living memory, though their operations were largely suppressed by 1803). Here it is gleefully reprised from “Come here to me!” which is a resource run by three fellows who cover Dublin’s social history devotedly.

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Pinking means “stabbing, jabbing”. Dindies are “dandies” or “maccaronies”.
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Cheers,
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~Q~

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“Death alive, man ! the women of quality will like you the better for a bit of a row. Why, what is there so much the go as Viscount Killkelly and Baron Killcoachy, as we call my friend Sir Terence Flynn, of county Galway, the chief of the Pinking Dindies, who nateley pinked his friend in a duel in the morning, and killed his coachman with a tinis ball in the afternoon ; and an’t them Cherokees too, an’t they the life of the place ; frightening all th’ ould ladies in their sedan chairs, smashing the fine furniture of their particular friends, and playing H-ll and Tommy through the town ? But at all events hadn’t I better go to my lord your father, for I suppose he knows nothing of your situation, and inthroduce myself as—”

The O’Briens and the O’Flahertys ; A National Tale (Vol. II, 1827) by Lady Morgan

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http://tinyurl.com/cmsrqrv

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Come Here To Me!

Dublin history is littered with famous gangs, from the Liberty Boys to the Animal Gangs. These gangs have entered the folklore, songs and popular history of the city. One rather unusual gang who haven’t quite received the same amount of attention are the ‘Pinking Dindies’ of the eighteenth century. The ‘Pinking Dindies’ are an interesting phenomenon in that they sprang from the upper-echelons of society, while gang violence often has its roots in lower socio-economic groups. When we think of gangs in Dublin we think of times of poverty and areas of misery, but this gang existed at a time of great prosperity in Dublin.

Margaret Leeson was Ireland’s first brothel owning ‘madam’, and a fascinating woman. Born in Killough, Co. Westmeath, she would become the most famous of Dublin’s eighteenth century madams, and even published her memoirs in 1797, opening the work by noting “I shall now commence with…

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One response to “The Pinking Dindies

  1. Reposted this on Annette J Dunlea Irish Author's Literary Blog.
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    [THE REPLY]

    Cheers, Annette, and a second doffing of the hat to “Come Here To Me!” in ould Eblana.

    ~Q~

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