Tag Archives: C. P. Meehan

The Life and Writings of James Clarence Mangan (O’Donoghue, 1897). Hours With Eminent Irishmen (McCarthy, 1886)

David James O’Donoghue, a renowned editor of Irish literature circa 1900, penned a thoroughgoing biography, interwoven with verse, prose, reminiscences, and letters, of the “strangely neglected” poet Clarence Mangan.

“The purpose of the present work is not merely to do something to make the poet better known—or to clear up the more apparent than real mystery of his life—the writer’s aim is to also attempt a survey of Mangan’s wonderful genius—to point out its ramifications, to show all its heights and depths.”

The Life and Writings of James Clarence Mangan by D. J. O’Donoghue (Dublin, 1897)

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100376859

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“His comrades were strange shadows, the bodyless creations wherein his ecstasy was most cunning. Phantoms trooped to him from the twilight land, lured, as Ulysses lured the ghosts from Hades, by a libation of blood.”

Hours With Eminent Irishmen and A Glimpse of Irish History by Justin Huntly McCarthy (New York, 1886)

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/011718205

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Essays in Prose and Verse by J. Clarence Mangan. The Prose Writings of James Clarence Mangan.

More library books in facsimile — vital to any store of Manganiana.

“Every scrap of writing from Mangan’s pen, or remotely relating to him, deserves to be rescued from the countless contingencies to which manuscripts are exposed.”  – Charles Patrick Meehan, C. C.

Essays in Prose and Verse by J. Clarence Mangan. Edited by C. P. Meehan, C. C. (Dublin, 1884)

https://archive.org/details/essaysinprosean00meehgoog

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“What was to be done ? Hastily to discuss the remainder of my wine, to order a fresh bottle, and to drink six or eight glasses in rapid succession, was the operation of a few minutes. And oh, what a change ! Cleverly, indeed, had I calculated upon a glorious reaction. Words I have none to reveal the quiescence of spirit that succeeded the interior balminess that steeped my faculties in blessed sweetness ; I felt renovated, created anew ! I had undergone an apotheosis ; I wore the cumbrous habiliments of flesh and blood no longer ; the shell, hitherto the circumscriber of my soul, was shivered ; I stood out in front of the universe a visible and tangible intellect, and beheld, with giant grasp, the key that had power to unlock the deep prison which enclosed the secrets of antiquity and futurity !”

(“An Extraordinary Adventure in the Shades”)

 

The Prose Writings of James Clarence Mangan (Centenary Edition) Edited by D. J. O’Donoghue

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/006130439

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The travelling skull of Jonathan Swift.

In reading the following article from “Come here to me!”, note as well the keen interest that Clarence Mangan took in phrenology. In fact, his biographer and editor, Father Meehan, published a “Phrenological Description of Mangan’s Head”. This curious monograph, dated 1835 (and furnished in these pages in the next post by the link to “Essays in Prose and Verse”, Meehan ed.), reveals the results of an examination that was performed by Professor John Wilson (who, incidentally, as a literary critic wrote under the pseudonym of “Christopher North” in Blackwood’s Magazine): “This is the head of one capable of warm attachment, and of having his mind enthusiastically wrought up to the consideration of any subject or the accomplishment of any purpose. He would be apt to live much more in the world of romance than in that of reality. … The principal ingredients of the character it indicates are taste, wit, extravagance, vividness of fancy, generosity, and proneness to yield to the solicitations of others.” ~Q~

Come Here To Me!

A cast of Jonathan Swift's skull, at Saint Patrick's Cathedral. A cast of Jonathan Swift’s skull, at Saint Patrick’s Cathedral (Credit:LIFE)

A rather unusual story from the history of Saint Patrick’s Cathedral involves the remains of Jonathan Swift and his companion Esther Johnson, popularly known as Stella. Today, a visitor to the cathedral will see the epitaph Swift himself wrote. While it is in Latin, it has been translated into English as follows:

Here is laid the Body
of Jonathan Swift, Doctor of Sacred Theology,
Dean of this Cathedral Church,

where fierce Indignation
can no longer
injure the Heart.
Go forth, Voyager,
and copy, if you can,
this vigorous (to the best of his ability)
Champion of Liberty.

He died on the 19th Day of the Month of October,
A.D. 1745, in the 78th Year of his Age.

Among the exhibited items in the Cathedral today is a cast of the skull of Swift, but incredibly this cast dates to…

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Mangan editions edited by John O’Daly, C. P. Meehan, and John Mitchel

Library books in facsimile; edited and introduced by personal acquaintances of the poet Clarence Mangan.

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THE POETS AND POETRY OF MUNSTER

“The English versions, by the ill-fated but lamented Clarence Mangan, are all in the same metre with the originals.”

Third Edition (edited by John O’Daly):

https://archive.org/details/poetspoetryofmun00mang

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100072216

Third Edition (edited by C. P. Meehan):

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008995067

Fourth Edition (edited by C. P. Meehan):

https://archive.org/stream/poetspoetryofmun00manguoft#page/n5/mode/2up

https://archive.org/details/poetspoetryofmun00manguoft

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/011819696

POEMS OF JAMES CLARENCE MANGAN, WITH BIOGRAPHICAL INTRODUCTION BY JOHN MITCHEL.

Copyright Edition, Dublin:

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/011984570

New York 1859 edition:

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/006518149

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